PPE - Personal Protective Equipment

PPE Helps to Avoid Health Complications from Explosions and Fires

DENIOS is the expert for environmentally friendly storage and safe handling of hazardous materials. Another vital aspect of daily production is the protection of human life. Combining safety, efficiency, and effectiveness, DENIOS offers both safety equipment and practical assistance for day-to-day operations. Personal Protection Equipment by DENIOS includes Breathing Protection and Intrinsically Safe Lights. These are essential in order to avoid health complications and explosions and fires.

Personal Protective Equipment, or PPE for short, is any equipment designed to be used or worn by workers to protect themselves against hazards to their safety and health. DENIOS offers a wide range of PPE equipment that ensure your employees are protected from dangers in the workplace.

It is essential that employees follow the correct health and safety procedures and wear the appropriate personal protective equipment when carrying out specific tasks to reduce the risk of injury at work. As an employer, it is your duty to provide them with the correct products and training to enable them to remain safe at work. As an employer, you must provide them with the correct products and training to enable them to remain safe at work. 

Which categories of personal protective equipment are there?

The Personal Protective Equipment Directive provides for product classification into three categories.

Level A- This is the highest level of protection for extremely harmful situations that require then the highest level of respiratory, skin, eye and mucous membrane protection.

A typical Level A ensemble includes:

  • Respiratory - Positive pressure (pressure demand), self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) (NIOSH approved), or positive-pressure supplied air respirator with escape SCBA
  • Protective Clothing – Fully encapsulated chemical protective suit (This will protect against splashes and eye protection is not a factor since the person is fully protected within the suit.)
  • Hand Protection – Gloves- Inner and Outer gloves, both pair being chemical resistant
  • Foot Protection - Boots, chemical resistant, steel toe and shank; (depending on suit boot construction, worn over or under suit boot.)

Level B – This level of protection is required when there is a significant respiratory risk, but skin and eye protection is not at the highest risk.  Level B clothing protects the wearer from chemical splashes.

A typical Level B ensemble includes:

  • Respiratory - Positive pressure (pressure demand), self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) (NIOSH approved), or positive-pressure supplied air respirator with escape SCBA
  • Protective Clothing – Chemical resistant clothing, including overalls with jacket, coveralls, chemical splash suits with hoods, disposable chemical resistant coveralls
  • Hand Protection – Gloves- Inner and Outer gloves, both pair being chemical resistant
  • Foot Protection - Boots, chemical resistant, steel toe and shank

Level C – This level of protection is selected when the respiratory risk is known, the concentration measured, and the correct criteria for using air-purifying respirators are met. Skin and eye exposure is unlikely with this level of protection. Monitoring of the air must be conducted, and if something changes the worker may need to be in a Level B ensemble.

A typical Level C ensemble includes:

  • Respiratory - Full-face or half-mask, air-purifying respirator (NIOSH approved) with correct cartridges for the respiratory nuisance
  • Protective Clothing -Chemical resistant clothing, including a one piece coverall, hooded two piece chemical splash suit, chemical resistant hood and apron, disposable chemical resistant coveralls
  • Hand Protection – Gloves- Inner and Outer gloves, both pair being chemical resistant
  • Foot Protection - Boots, steel toe and shank, chemical resistant

Level D – This level of protection is the lowest level of protection and primarily consists of a work uniform.  PPE is used for nuisance contamination only. Depending on the situation, this level requires only the basic PPE for minimal worker protection. If respiratory or skin hazards exist, then the level should be upgraded accordingly.

What are the types of PPE?

PPE is meant to keep the worker safe from any hazards that possess a risk to the health or safety of that individual.  PPE is broken down into groups.

Respiratory – any device that will supply clean uncontaminated air to the work, or any device that protects the worker from breathing in contaminated air.  These devices can be a simple as a disposable respirator that blocks out particles to a self-contained breathing apparatus that supplies clean air directing to the wearer.

Head and Eye Protection – protection against any type of risk to the head or eyes.  A simple hard hat can protect a worker from falling debris overhead to a side blow to the head.  Safety glasses and goggles can protect a workers eye from impact, dust, gas vapors, or extreme lighting conditions

Skin – protective clothing can protect a worker from dust and dirt to chemical splashes.  The product can be a simple as an apron or as significant as a fully encapsulated chemical suit. The protection is dependent on the situation and what risk you are trying to protect the individual from.

Hand Protection – gloves come in many different varieties for the many different jobs we do with our hands.  From protection a worker from cuts and punctures to chemical exposure, there is a glove to meet any potential risk.

Noise – hearing is another area where workers need protection.  If a worker is exposed to loud noises on a daily basis, the risk of hearing loss is great.  Don’t look past the work who is only exposed to a loud noise once or twice a day.  Anything 85 decibels or above will need to be evaluated for protection such as ear plugs or ear muffs.